• Volume 17 Number 1 - January 2010

    Features

    The Cape Fear area of North Carolina is far enough north that it has all the seasons, but for the most part, winters are mild.

    The Cape Fear area of North Carolina is far enough north that it has all the seasons, but for the most part, winters are mild. Not that it doesn’t occasionally get really cold, and there might be snow or ice storms every few years, but the winters are typically mild enough to allow fishing.

    Winter is prime time to catch good numbers and quality catfish on Lakes Moultrie and Marion.

    When Pete Pritchard points to his sonar graph and says, “Look at that; there’s a pile of fish under those shad,” odds are good that fishermen on his boat are about to get their strings stretched.

    During the rut, young bucks will point the way to the bruisers.

    EDITOR’S NOTE: For the next 12 months, renowned wildlife photographer Tommy Kirkland will give readers an inside look into the private world of whitetail deer.

    During the rut, yound bucks will point the way to the bruisers.

    EDITOR’S NOTE: For the next 12 months, renowned wildlife photographer Tommy Kirkland will give readers an inside look into the private world of whitetail deer.

    Hyde County is waterfowl heaven for late-season hunters.

    Bill Slate grew up enjoying extraordinary waterfowl hunting on the St. Lawrence River in his native New York. Then, he moved his construction business to Monroe, N.C., and his duck hunting literally took a dive — until he discovered Hyde County.

    Scouting and finding food sources are the keys to January duck success.

    Brian Rucker of Columbia lives for duck season, and he knows that scouting is the surest way to discover the latest duck movements.

    Take these tips into the field, and you’ll end up with a bulging game bag. But you’d better stock up on biscuits first.

    “Hunt in here” — the mantra of the dog handler — rings across the frosted hillsides as the sun begins to peak over the east side of Abbeville County.

    Hunting bunnies with beagles not only is a Southern tradition, but it keeps hunters in shape and provides tasty meals.

    The beagles’ tails appeared to be wagging fingers, a wave of vertical, white-tipped periscopes, eight to 10 inches long, moving purposefully through the green and gray of a frost-covered January morning.

    Waters around Harkers Island offer great January action on speckled trout.

    While it bustles along pretty well from about Easter to Thanksgiving, Harkers Island is a very slow-paced place during the winter — and that’s not a bad thing. About the only people around are the locals and a few hardy fishermen who know the speckled trout season doesn’t end with the first time the water freezes in the dog’s bowl. For those folks willing to wear snuggies, a heavy coat and gloves, there are trout to be caught all winter.

    Late winter brings sparkling, clear water to the tidal marshes around Charleston, which creates opportunities and challenges for redfish anglers.

    It starts out looking like a dark, nondescript mass, sort of like a grass bed or maybe a broad bottom indention.

    Still-hunt, stalk or follow a dog — they’re all effective ways to fill your game vest.

    How soon we forget! Three generations ago, when both deer and turkeys were scarce as hen’s teeth, squirrel hunting was the top-rated sport in terms of hunter participation in South Carolina and across the South.

    This border lake is a largemouth bass hotspot in the coldest of weather.

    Tarheel State fishermen have a big choice during the winter: stay home and watch television and see guys catch fish from the phosphate pits of Florida or go fishing.