• Volume 17 Number 8 - August 2010

    Features

    Prospects look great this season despite a harvest drop in 2009.

    The cliche that claims “the more things change, the more they remain the same” apparently applies to North Carolina’s whitetail deer herd.

    Mountain Island, overshadowed by bigger neighbors, provides first-string bass action

    Many great teams have a superstar or two who account for 90 percent of the attention, popularity and identity. The other 10 percent of the roster consistently adds production and contributes to overall success. In times of need, an alternate can step up and fill a role when needed.

    Take a topwater approach for the most fun a reef donkey can offer.

    Capt. Jot Owens checked the wind before ever setting foot on the dock. All the flags were hanging limp, and the lines extending up the aluminum masts of sailboats were silenced of their nearly incessant summertime clanging. The weather report was for more of the same, calm winds and slight seas.

    High Rock Lake provides great summertime catfish action.

    Lexington’s Charlie Kingen has fished for about every species that swims in High Rock Lake. Working for Maynard Edwards’ Yadkin Lakes Guide Service, Kingen has taken clients fishing for largemouth bass, crappie, striped bass and channel catfish.

    Hard mast nutrition is crucial for whitetails, and it strongly influences the rut and reproduction.

    A white-tailed buck leaves his bedding site in a stand of small pines. Instead of heading to the clover plot, he scales up a small ridge to seek out what is beneath the trees.

    Hard mast nutrition is crucial for whitetails, and it strongly influences the rut and the reproduction.

    A white-tailed buck leaves his bedding site in a stand of small pines. Instead of heading to the clover plot, he scales up a small ridge to seek out what is beneath the trees.

    The rivers and estuaries around Edisto Island are full of summer sharks that offer hot action either way you look.

    The only thing missing was the lonely ringing of the bell on the buoy marking the entrance to the South Edisto River. Otherwise, the anglers aboard the Marsh Hen, waiting at anchor, putting out a chum slick, could have been on board the Orca, waiting for a visit from the 20-foot great white shark of Jaws fame.

    Early season is prime time to bring home a buck and some bacon.

    As the Aug. 15 opening of the Lowcountry deer season approaches, it’s not surprising that a lot of hunters go hog wild getting ready for those first few days in the tree stand.

    Fly-fishing on the Coosaw River flats is quite rewarding this time of year.

    Early on a pleasant, late-summer morning, Capt. Tyler Gault and his daughter, Sherri Hightower, left a grocery-store parking lot on Ladies Island. A tailing tide was rolling in, and the flooded grass flats along the Coosaw River were waiting.

    Soundside or in the ocean, paddling will get you within casting range of a lot of fish.

    Matt Landrum get to work and play at the same time. Standing in a parking area at the base of the Mann’s Harbor Bridge, surrounded by vehicles carrying colorful kayaks, Landrum prepared to join a small armada of paddlers heading out on a beautiful morning.

    Operated with anglers in mind, SCDNR-managed lakes combine easy access and excellent opportunities to catch fish.

    Big things really do come in small packages — sometimes. Any fisherman who doubts that needs only to look at the S.C. Department of Natural Resources’ “State Managed Lakes” program. Nineteen different lakes, most of which cover less than 100 acres, collectively present a tremendous amount of fishing opportunity to South Carolina fishermen.

    The upcoming bluefish run around Masonboro Inlet is a great attraction for anglers.

    David Franklin of Carolina Beach was heading out of Masonboro Inlet for an evening of fishing for speckled trout, red drum, flounder — or anything else that would bite. As his boat cruised past the southern rock jetty, he saw a flock of pelicans, gulls and terns circling, hovering, then diving into the water.

    Pay attention to these guides’ tactics, and you’ll catch stripers on Lake Hartwell, even when it’s ‘too hot’ to fish.

    Summer is here, and the fishing is hot. Everything is hot. The air is hot. The water is hot. Stand on the open deck of a boat at mid-day and pretty soon, you’ll be hot too. There’s no way you’re going to catch fish in this heat. Right?