• Carolina Fishing

    The flier

    The first thing most anglers  who catch their first flier think is that they’ve caught a hybrid bream/crappie. The flier, Centrarchus macropterus, is a sunfish native to muddy-bottomed swamps, ponds, weedy lakes and backwaters, mostly in the coastal planes in both Carolinas. The biggest fliers, which can live up to five years, get to about 12 inches and a pound.

    December 31, 1969 at 6:00pm

    Scotty fly-rod holder with side/deck mount

    When it comes to bream fishing from a paddlecraft, especially with fly tackle, having a secure place to store your rod is critical. The problem is that while most fishing kayaks come with rod holders, they typically only fit spinning or baitcasting rods. Fortunately, you can buy aftermarket rod holders designed specifically for fly rods.

    December 31, 1969 at 6:00pm

    Yak Attack Hawg Trough Mounting Kit

    One of the biggest differences between a powerboat and a kayak when it comes to entering fish in a tournament is the use of a livewell. Since paddlers use cameras to capture photos of caught fish, having a handy measuring tool at your fingertips is a must.

    December 31, 1969 at 6:00pm

    How do slip bobbers work?

    Slip-bobber rigs consist of a piece of thread tied into a knot on the fishing line, a glass or plastic bead, then the cork. The knot slides up and down to adjust the depth you’re fishing, the bead keeps the bobber from slipping over the knot and the cork slides freely up and down the line, stopping when it reaches the knot. When using slip bobbers in strong current, you must use enough weight to keep the bait down, otherwise the current will push the slip bobber through the line all the way back to the hook. It may take as much as an ounce when the current is really ripping, so make sure your slip cork is big enough to handle it. 

    December 31, 1969 at 6:00pm

    Imitating an injured baitfish

    While inshore gamefish in the Surf City area will strike natural baits such as shrimp and mullet, they also take kindly to rattling lures.

    December 31, 1969 at 6:00pm

    A rubberized landing net prevents any damage to fish

    A rubber net is an important piece of gear. Not only does it make landing a fish easier, it is slicker than monofilament or nylon nets, and that prevents damage to the slime coat of the fish. 

    December 31, 1969 at 6:00pm

    Release and ReSpeck

    With its headquarters in Ladson, S.C., just a few miles from the saltwater fishing mecca of Charleston, folks at Z-Man Fishing Products understood what the cold-stun kill of speckled trout this past January could mean to local fisheries.

    December 31, 1969 at 6:00pm

    Go “stinky” for flounder

    New fishing tools arrive on the market every year, and many are considered more gimmick than innovation.

    December 31, 1969 at 6:00pm

    Carolina rig or jigheads for flounder?

    Few fishermen will argue that flounder prefer to feed in the lower third of the water column. Their body shape suggests that they spend most of their time along the bottom. As a result, lures and baits should stay on or near the bottom to capture a flounder’s attention. When using live bait, the choice of terminal tackle can make a big different in presentation. 

    December 31, 1969 at 6:00pm

    Fishing for Spanish mackerel in North Carolina vs. South Carolina

    Fishermen in North Carolina and South Carolina generally look for baitfish, structure and water flow when fishing for Spanish mackerel. The primary places to find concentrations of the small mackerel are around inlets, in close proximity to wrecks and artificial reefs, and harassing schools of bait around natural structure.

    December 31, 1969 at 6:00pm