Fishing News and Information

Reel Fishing
Knowing how the tide runs in a certain area can put you in position to fish productive shallow-water areas like this bay with oysters. Not knowing the tide can leave you stranded. Fishing the tide

Rick Patterson said it is important to know and understand tides before fishing on the flats and bays around Swansboro. Tide stages vary in time at different locations according to their relationship and distance from inlets, and it’s of absolute importance to know how tidal movement affects fish and when to move on and off shallow flats and bays to keep from being stranded.


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By trailing a length of logging chain behind the boat, anglers fishing from the bow can go slow even in strong winds. Dealing with wind

As a tournament crappie fisherman Charlotte’s Mike Parrott is no stranger to fishing when he has to. He doesn’t get the luxury of choosing when tournaments will be held and most times, unless a dire situation exists, it’s time to hit the water. Like the Boy Scouts of America like to say:  “Be Prepared”.


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Side- and down-imaging technology can help crappie anglers find and orient to fish before even wetting a line. Sonar on the side

One of the ways that crappie pro Kent Driscoll has stayed on top of tournament leader boards has been by mastering the use of the newest sonar technology, and he relies on it as much as anything in his boat.


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Strong cold fronts will send crappie deep into cover where fishing straight down to the fish may be the only way to get one to bite. Cold-front finesse fishing

The frequent cold fronts that wash over North Carolina in late February and through March can cause crappie to halt their progression toward the shallows, sink deep into brush or other cover and be hard to catch. 


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Durham’s Ridgecrest Baptist Church puts on eight crappie tournaments as part of its Outdoors Ministry each year. Outdoors ministry features fishing events, kids, icons

Rod King began the Outdoor Ministry at Durham’s Ridgecrest Baptist Church nine years ago.


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Fishing the Catawba Bugger

“Let it sink, twitch the line twice, followed by a long trip to take in the slack,” guide Scott Cunningham said. “You don’t want to have enough line out to make a lot of false casts. You want to make short, quick casts for slow, methodical fishing.”


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This 18-inch brown trout is eligible for a citation from the N.C. Angler Recognition Program and is common sight on the upper Catawba River. Trophies galore

The N.C. Wildlife Resources Commission defines a trophy brown trout as any fish weighing 2 1/2 pounds or more or measuring 18 inches or longer — according to the N.C. Angler Recognition Program.


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This striper from the Devils Gut area of the Roanoke River is a fine example of the age class that ‘s driven the fishery the past two years. Expect more, bigger stripers this year

Fishermen had a great 2014 catching stripers on the Roanoke River, and the great spawn in 2011 should continue the good fishing this year. But those good times may not repeat the next few years.


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Guide Richard Andrews can fish soft-plastic baits weedless with a Mission Fishing jighead. Use this unique weedless lure fix

Guide Richard Andrews uses a unique way to create a weedless jighead for fishing creeks along the lower Roanoke River that are infested with bottom snags, usually cypress knees.


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Warm days in late winter and early spring can not only bring out comfortable clothing, but active feeding in redfish. Weather is a key factor in catching jetty redfish

A nice, sunny spring day on the water feels good to the fishermen, but even more important, a warming trend can actually improve fishing, especially at the jetties that line Little River Inlet. 


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A good, high-definition depth finder is crucial to being able to locate the outside edges of the Little River jetties where redfish lurk this month. Picture the bottom

From fishing in 8 inches of water for tailing redfish to deep-dropping for swordfish in 750 feet of water, knowing and understanding what is down below is crucial on a fishing trip.  Anglers need to invest in a high-definition sounder to produce clean images of the bottom to fully appreciate the possibilities and of course, catch more fish. 


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Neal Osteen of Hendersonville landed this 51-inch muskellunge, estimated at better than 40 pounds, while fishing in the French Broad River. Hendersonville man's French Broad muskie that might have challenged record

Neal Osteen of Hendersonville wasn’t exactly surprised when he landed a monstrous, 51 inch muskie from the French Broad River on March 8, but was still overjoyed at landing his best muskie to date.


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