Hunting News and Information

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Straight Shootin
Harness available technology and plenty of scouting before and during deer season can be done without setting foot in the woods and leaving any human scent. Link up to technology and make your deer scouting a remote venture

Hunting has definitely entered the 21st century, with range-finding rifle scopes, night-vision binoculars for predator and hog hunting, and apps for our smartphones that tell us exactly when the sun rises and sets. With new technology comes new ways to scout off-site, preventing you from putting down any scent that might disturb the deer you’re targeting.


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U.S. Army Sgt. Cody Harris of the 82nd Airborne arrowed this great buck at Fort Bragg. Fort Bragg spits out great archery buck for 82nd Airborne soldier

It’s not often a hunter’s first deer is a trophy animal. It’s even rarer to take a Pope and Young Club buck as a first bow kill. But Sgt. Cody Harris did his homework – and the needed work – and reaped a nice reward Sept. 14 at Fort Bragg.


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The hunting clothes that Debbie Hall wore when she killed this Stokes County 8-point buck wouldn’t have been available for women 15 years ago. Dressed to the nines, finally

Katrina Arpin remembers what it was like to get dressed to go hunting 15 years ago, when she got her start in the wilds of Minnesota.


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Rhonda Snyder took this Orange County trophy last fall with a crossbow. Crossbows have led women into hunting

One factor that many people believe has had a big impact on women joining the ranks of hunters is new, more-liberal regulations regarding crossbows.


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Two programs are available that pair bowhunters who need a place to hunt with landowners who want their deer population reduced. Programs will put hunters, landowners together

Hunters looking for the opportunity to hunt land that’s close to suburban or urban areas have two programs existing that could put them in touch with landowners who would like their shrubbery and/or gardens protected from the onslaught of whitetail deer.


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Fifty municipalities in North Carolina will participate in the Urban Archery Season, which runs from mid-January to mid-February, 2015. North Carolina’s urban archery initiative

The deer population around the suburban areas continues to boom, and the list of complaints from homeowners losing their valuable landscaping is becoming endless — not to mention the number of deer-vehicle collisions is on the rise, with millions of dollars of damages nationwide.


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A posted sign in the suburbs might point to a great hunting opportunity if handled correctly. Seek out areas protected by “No Hunting” signs!

As development progresses, more and more woodlots that once housed plenty of wildlife will be added to the asphalt jungle. Visions of progress seen through the developer’s eyes brings big bucks to property owners along the outskirts of town, yet some landowners refuse to sell land that has been in their family for generations and these areas remain wooded, undisturbed, and often have “No Hunting” signs on every perimeter tree. If played right with the landowners, hunters can get into these areas for some fantastic hunting opportunities.


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Beavers can be very destructive when they flood a lot of timber, but they also provide plenty of waterfowl and aquatic habitat. Leave it to beaver — or not

Are beavers good or bad for man and the environment? It depends on who you ask. The beaver can create good and evil in the same motion. All they do is chow down on items in their food bank and build dams. What is horrible about that? Again, it depends on who and what is affected.


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Killing too many bucks of any specific age class will prove detrimental in the future. Beware of killing too many bucks of any size

Most hunters enter the woods aiming to kill a trophy buck, or at least a good deer to take home to momma. And just about every hunter will want to take a second, third and even fourth buck if the opportunities present themselves, but hunters can get too much of a good thing and reap havoc on the future buck population on their hunting grounds.


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North Carolina may change the way it manages captive populations of whitetail deer, elk and other deer species. Public hearing on changing deer-farm management is Tuesday in Raleigh

The second of two public hearings will be held on Tuesday night at the N.C. Wildlife Resources Commission’s headquarters on N.C. State’s Centennial Campus in Raleigh as the Commission decides whether to allow for an increase in the number of deer farms in North Carolina.


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Jason Carter's entry of this big 8-point buck was drawn as winner of North Carolina Sportsman's first monthly Bag-A-Buck contest. Snow Camp hunter is first Bag-A-Buck contest winner

Jason Carter of Snow Camp, aka “jcarter” has won North Carolina Sportsman’s first monthly Bag-A-Buck contest for 2014 with his entry of a big 8-point buck from Alamance County.


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The sudden appearance of tremendous numbers of teal made the short, early segment of duck season a winner for many North Carolina hunters. Surprising arrival of teal makes early duck season a good one on Yadkin River

If often seems that North Carolina’s waterfowl seasons are too early or too late to match up with migrating waterfowl. The birds stall up north due to warm weather or push south in between the staggered seasons, so hunters can’t get to them. But the short opening segment of the season opener broke the mold and put hunters on the Yadkin River right in the middle of the early season migration.


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