Hunting News and Information

Straight Shootin
Don't leave a bullet and powder charge in your muzzleloader at the end of an unsuccessful hunting day. Unload it one of two or three ways, as this video explains. Don't leave a charge in the barrel of your blackpowder gun

Blackpowder weapons are extremely popular in some areas of the Carolinas because they allow hunters to be in the woods for an extra week or two.


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Seeing women in the outdoors more frequently on TV has led to more women developing an interest in hunting. Deer dustiní damsels - Increase in numbers of women joining ranks of hunters in North Carolina has several causes, according to experts

It’s been impossible to miss that over the past handful of years, more and more photographs of smiling women kneeling behind dead deer, ducks and turkeys have been showing up in the incoming e-mail files at North Carolina Sportsman.


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Choice of stand sites is biggest variable in setting up for a big October buck in North Carolina. Muzzleloader madness - Location is the key to killing a big blackpowder buck in North Carolina this month

Most people have heard the “location, location, location” mantra that describes what it takes for a profitable business venture that requires real estate.


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Dennis Moser of Indian Trail has taken trophy bucks smack in the middle of the suburbs around Charlotte and Shelby. Bucks in your backyard - Deer-hunting opportunities abound in suburban, urban areas where whitetails are thriving and unpressured

The first major signs of rutting activity begin in October, the first full month of fall, and buck fever grabs most hunters across the state. Plenty of hunters will make it into the woods this month, many will go home with meat in the freezer and some will make a trip to the taxidermist.†


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Is it a doe, or a button buck? Learn how to distinguish them and why itís important to take one out of the herd and protect the other. Protect those buck fawns

Even though the deer season has arrived in one form or another, the majority of deer slayers begin to ramp up their efforts in October. Cooler weather sets in this month, making it comfortable for all hunters to sit motionless, perched in a tree stand or well hidden in a ground blind. For some hunters, a buck big enough to be eligible for a $500 taxidermy investment is about the only animal worthy of a lead projectile. But for the rest of the deer-hunting community, meat in the freezer reigns supreme.†


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Black Rack Black Rack

Unlike antlers of rattling bags that produce unnatural sounds, the Black Rack rattling system was designed as two full deer racks that allow you to create the illusion of two bucks aggressively crashing and fighting. While most antlers are light in color and can be visibly seen up to 500 yards away, the Black Rack from Flextone Game Calls was designed to keep your rattling sequence concealed during any big-buck encounter. Don’t just sit around and wait for a deer to wander into the area, bring mature bucks charging to your hunting location with the Black Rack.


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Flex Neck Field Goose Flex Neck Field Goose

The Flex Neck Field Goose from Fowl Foolers features a unique and innovative pose-able neck which can be set to any position desired or changed throughout the day. The Flex Neck Field Goose decoy’s alterable position gives hunters unprecedented control over the look and realism of their spread. Each decoy is also made with a superior quality foam body wrapped in burlap and will last generations.


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Todd Lowe's enormous Davie County buck may wind up at No. 2 all-time in North Carolina record books for non-typical bucks killed with a bow. Davie County giant may rank as high as No. 2 archery non-typicals

Todd Lowe of Mocksville likes the ninth month — a lot. Three years ago, on Sept. 27, 2011, he arrowed the No. 3 non-typical whitetail buck ever taken by an Ohio archer, a 26-pointer that tallied 224 4/8 inches. Last Friday, he hit the jackpot again, taking a huge non-typical from Davie County that may wind up being No. 2 in North Carolina in that category.


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Disabled sportsmen who can't attend a special hunt for which they're drawn can now be replaced by an alternate, thanks to a change in N.C. Wildlife Resources Commission regulations. Regulation change is a good one for disabled-sportsman hunts

The N.C. Wildlife Resources Commission has implemented a much-needed change to its popular Tier III permit hunts, allowing for “backup” hunters to take the place of hunters who are drawn for the special hunts but are unable to attend.


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Steven Davis' huge Davidson County buck, taken Sept. 18 with a crossbow, is likely the biggest ever killed with archery equipment in North Carolina. Davidson County man kills enormous non-typical buck with crossbow

The biggest buck ever killed in North Carolina with archery equipment didn’t come from one of the counties normally associated with trophy bucks, but one that’s come to be known more for barbecue, Richard Childress and Bob Timberlake. Last Thursday morning, Steven Davis of the Davidson County town of Welcome killed an enormous buck sprouting sticker points everywhere that will likely wind up measuring somewhere mighty close to 190 inches.


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North Carolina's first-ever fatality involving archery equipment took place last Thursday in Transylvania County. Crossbow involved in North Carolina's first-ever archery related fatality

North Carolina’s first archery-related hunting fatality in history occurred the evening of Sept. 18 in Transylvania County when George Harley Case Jr., 58, of Pisgah Forest died when he was struck by a crossbow bolt fired by a friend who mistook him for a deer.


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Bobby Davidson's enormous Moore County buck has a 4x4 main-frame rack with twin split G-2s. Moore County produces huge buck for archery pro

Bobby Davidson of Sanford has travelled all over the country to kill big bucks as a pro staffer for Mathews Archery – Iowa, Illinois, South Dakota, Missouri – so who would have thought that his biggest buck of his life would come from family farm in Moore County? But it did: a 169 1/8-inch buck taken on Sunday, Sept. 14.


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