Hunting News and Information

Straight Shootin
Johnny Lawrence killed this great non-typical buck on the first day of blackpowder season in Rockingham County. Pine Hall hunter knocks off great Rockingham County non-typical buck

Out of a thousand week-old trail-cam photos, one had Johnny Lawrence of Pine Hall so excited he woke up extra early on Nov. 1, the opening day of blackpowder season in Rockingham County. With a 17-point non-typical buck on the ground by 8:15, the excitement really began.


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Tim Oakley's huge drop-tine buck from Caswell County was the result of two years watching him grow and letting him walk. Burlington hunter drops hammer on huge Caswell County buck

Hunters who don’t think it’s possible for deer to grow trophy racks in a county that gets above-average hunting pressure need to talk to Tim Oakley of Burlington. On Nov. 10, Oakley ended a two-year saga by killing a huge Caswell County buck with a 5x4 main-frame rack and one drop tine that has been green-scored at 157 Boone and Crockett Club points.


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Pistols like the Glock 17 and 26 in 9mm can legally now be used for hunting in North Carolina. Regulation changes allow hunters to take more handguns into the woods

A change in the N.C. Wildlife Resources Commission’s 2014-2015 regulations is allowing allows hunters to carry a wider variety of handguns into the deer woods.


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Sgt. John Valles killed this nice buck on a Combat Warriors-sponsored hunt in Warren County and later won the October Bag-A-Buck contest. Army veteran wins October Bag-A-Buck contest

Staff Sgt. John Valles of the U.S. Army had a chance to go on his first deer hunt with Combat Warriors Inc. in late October as a guest of the Embro Hunting Club in Warren County. He took the chance, and it turned out to be a great decision. Valles, a 34-year-old native of Houston, Tex., living in Fayetteville, killed a 7-point buck late on the afternoon of Oct. 25. A few days later, he entered the buck in North Carolina Sportsman’s Bag-A-Buck Contest, and he was drawn on Nov. 1 as the winner of the monthly contest for October.


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Legislators listened to complaints about the N.C. Wildlife Resources Commission’s deer-farming rules on Nov. 18 and allowed no opposing speakers. Deer-farm supporters blast Commission over stringent regulations

A select committee of the N.C. House listened on Tuesday as four deer-farmers from North Carolina and two out-of-state supporters of deer farming castigated the N.C. Wildlife Resources Commission’s management of state deer farms and their owners without anyone associated with the Commission getting a chance to respond.


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Ronald Nixon’s Orange County buck was one of North Carolina’s best in 2013-14. It scored almost 165 non-typical inches. That .06 of a deer must have been difficult to kill

Here are some facts about North Carolina’s deer harvest in 2013-14 and from the 2012-13 Hunter Harvest surveys compiled by the N.C. Wildlife Resources Commission.


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To attract does, bucks deposit scent in their scrapes and on overhanging limbs known as “licking branches.” Make your breaks with mock scrapes

Creating “mock” scrapes during the rut is a deer-hunting tactic many hunters practice.


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Jonathan Reaser’s 2006 Rockingham County trophy scored 206 5/8 inches and is the third-largest non-typical buck ever killed in North Carolina. Rockingham County: a firearms-frendly place

Rockingham County lies in the northern Piedmont, along the Virginia-North Carolina border. The land that became Rockingham County was broken off from Guilford County in 1785 and named for Charles Watson-Wentworth, the second Marquesse of Rockingham, a two-term prime minister of Great Britain in the mid-1700s.


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November is the time to flood your waterfowl impoundment to put the groceries within range of greenheads and other ducks. Time to flood duck honey holes

Even though the short duck season has come and gone by the first of November, the core duck seasons remain, and the flood of migrating waterfowl is on its way. Waterfowl impoundments should be fully flooded this month to capture these birds when they arrive.


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Predator hunter Ken Truesdale said that night-imaging technology has made night-hunting for hogs a snap. Thermal-imaging devices are key for night hog hunts

Farmers just about everywhere will quickly denounce the wild pig. Every year, wild pigs, aka feral hogs, are responsible for excessive crop and habitat destruction that contribute to tens of thousands of dollars every year. And their increasing numbers and expanding range are tough to combat under normal hunting conditions.


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Lush, green food plots really become deer magnets when early-season foods disappear and mast is consumed. Keep deer stores stocked

For deer hunters rooted in the Carolinas, November is a demanding and sometimes challenging month in the deer woods. From intense rutting behavior and food availability to drastic changes in the weather, the pressure is on the  deer herd. Hunters and land managers must stay on their toes to keep their property attractive when the pressure surges. 


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Piedmont deer hunters are learning that changes in bear-hunting regulations have changed what they can use as bait for whitetails; throw out the molasses and salt! Piedmont deer hunters now having to sort through the bait pile

This year, deer hunters in the Piedmont are finding themselves confused for the same reason that hunters along the coastal plain and in the mountains have been since 2007. What can they use for bait and what’s not allowed?


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