Hunting News and Information

Straight Shootin
Heather Horton's 129-inch Chatham County buck had a 6 1/2-inch drop tine and was still in full velvet when she killed it on the opening day of archery season. Chatham County buck is trophy for female crossbow hunter
A hot, humid day and an approaching storm with high winds didn’t deter Heather Horton from completing a memorable hunt on the first day of bow season in Chatham County this past Saturday. What made it memorable? How about a 9-point buck with a 6 1/2-inch drop tine, its antlers still in full velvet?
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The N.C. Wildlife Resources Commission has reported an outbreak of hemorrhagic disease in the whitetail deer herd in Northwest North Carolina. Commission schedules meeting to dicsuss hemorrhagic disease in Northwest North Carolina
The N.C. Wildlife Resources Commission has scheduled a meeting to present information to the public about the scope and impact of an outbreak of hemorrhagic disease (HD) on deer in western North Carolina. The meeting is scheduled for 6-6:30 p.m. on Sept. 20 at Wilkes Community College in Wilkesboro, just before the Commission’s annual public hearing on proposed regulations.
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PVC pipe and fittings is all you need to build an inexpensive deer feeder. Gravity deer feeder easy, inexpensive to make
Feeders offer a great way to help pattern deer and present temporary holding areas for deer in their normal traveling corridors. In this video, Bill Howard shares how to build and set up a gravity-feed deer feeder. For less than $20 and in about 10 minutes, you can build a feeder that is much more efficient than just dumping corn on the ground, yet costs much less than broadcast feeders.
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Waterfowl hunters have had their daily bag limit for scaup, aka bluebills, doubled from two to four for the 2012-13 season. State announces waterfowl season dates, bag limits
The N.C. Wildlife Resources Commission has set dates and bag limits for 2012-13 waterfowl seasons, and there's little that was not expected. The season will still be split into three parts: a short season in early October, a longer season around Thanksgiving and a 5-week season bridging December and January.
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Young hunters are a common sight in dove fields; getting them off on the right foot in terms of safety  afield is important. Teach your children well...
Dove hunting has become as much of a social gathering as a hunt over the past 20 years. The promise of a barbecued pork, chicken and all the fixing’s highlights many hunts over Labor Day weekend. Because of this, many new hunters, especially young ones, are introduced to the sport each year.
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Pat Foy Brady of Reidsville said practicing with a few rounds of skeet before dove season will help sharpen your shooting eye before dove season arrives. How to hit a dove
The anomaly of mourning doves is they weigh on average only 4 ½ ounces but are one of the most-difficult-to-down game birds in the world.
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The N.C. Wildlife Resources Commission publishes reports on the conditions of its game-lands dove fields on its website as the season approaches. Check Web site for dove-field updates
During the first two weeks of August, biologists with the N.C. Wildlife Resource Commission send information to Raleigh about what’s been planted and is growing at game-lands food plot across the state.
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Public dove fields, many planted in corn, sunflowers and other grains, are scattered across the state to attract doves. Doing the Dove Dance
The best dove hunt floating on top of my memory happened when I was about 12 or 13 years old. My dad and about a dozen of his friends drove to an Alamance County farm. The group’s alpha male, Lennie, was a respected timber cruiser for a local sawmill who sharpened chain saws at his cigar smoke-filled repair shop at night. Dad and his friends often met at "Lennie’s place" every night after dinner — if they escaped their wives. From two to a half dozen trucks were parked outside while inside these guys spun yarns — some of them true — about their outdoors adventures, exploits of smarter-than-human bird dogs, wily old gobblers, big bucks, dumb relatives, crack shots they’d made and crack pots in Raleigh and Washington, D.C.
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The N.C. Wildlife Resources Commission has approved a long-term bear-management plan, but it doesn’t propose any specific changes. No changes coming in bear regs
At its July 12 meeting in Raleigh, the N.C. Wildlife Resources Commission unanimously voted to approve recommendations for bear management that staff biologists had been working on for two years.
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The Roanoke River Wetlands/National Wildlife Refuge probably has the biggest deer herd of any public-hunting area in North Carolina, but the Jordan game lands, in close proximity to Raleigh, Durham and Chapel Hill, gets heavier pressure and had the state’s biggest public-land harvest last season. 2012-13 Game Lands Preview
North Carolina’s 89 game lands cover 2 million acres and spread from the mountains to the sea. They offer sportsmen who don’t have access to private property many opportunities to hunt every species of game in the state — from doves to black bear. The N.C. Wildlife Resources Commission’s biologists and crews manage these public lands, which also play a key role in conservation and preservation. Commission staff members create habitat not only for wild game, but for animals that aren’t hunted plus for native plants, streams and the fish that swim in them.
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Carolina Cradle Carolina Cradle
The Carolina Cradle can be affixed to the stock of your favorite turkey gun and allows you to work any 3 5/8-inch call with minimal movement. Your friction calls can be changed from slate, to glass, to any of the popular calls on the market today on a moment’s notice. No more placing your calls down before picking up your gun. Hunters can now work a bird and still have their firearm in a ready mode.
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Waterfowl impoundments at Butner-Falls of Neuse Game Lands are planted in the spring and flooded in the fall to attract waterfowl of all kinds. Grant will help fund repairs to Butner-Falls of Neuse waterfowl impoundments
After 25 years, even flashboards and risers wear out, and that’s happening at waterfowl impoundments on the upper end of the Butner-Falls of the Neuse Game Land in Durham, Granville and Wake counties. Fortunately, a $125,000 supplied to Ducks Unlimited by a grant from the office of Roy Cooper, North Carolina’s attorney general, through its Environmental Enhancement Grand (EEG) Program, will help make repairs and create better wetlands habitat on the public lands.
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