Hunting News and Information

Straight Shootin
Blake Cox’s cinnamon wild turkey gobbler he shot April 20 in Guilford County is a 1-in-300,000 coloration pattern, experts said.


Cinnamon-colored gobbler spices up season for Kernersville hunter
Odd coloration in Eastern wild turkeys is fairly common across the southeastern states, but Blake Cox of Kernersville bagged a gobbler that may take the 2012 prize in North Carolina. Cox, 55, and was hunting in Guilford County on April 20 when he shot a gobbler that not only had light cinnamon-brown feathers but also white quills, and its belly and legs were mostly white with mottled brown specks.
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Guide B.J. Keener holds up the gobbler taken by 8-year-old Cory Holbrooks of Franklin on an April 21 hunt for handicapped kids in Macon County. Two youths take gobblers on Macon County handicapped hunt
For Miguel Villagomez, a visually impaired eighth grader who was guided by Gene Piver of Asheville, a long-time member of the National Wild Turkey Federation, the hunt ended with a bang at first light that left a big gobbler flopping on the ground. It took a little longer for 8-year-old Cory Holbrooks of Franklin to connect, but it was no less sweet. Holbrooks, whose walking ability is impaired, high-stepped through a cow pasture in the predawn darkness, learning that it was best to avoid the scattered, plate-sized dark spots.
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The N.C. Wildlife Resources Commission is considering a proposal to expand youth-only turkey hunting from one to six days. Commission considers expanding youth turkey-hunting opportunities
The N.C. Wildlife Resources Commission will take to its July 5 meeting in Raleigh several proposals for changes to the spring wild-turkey season, including a week-long youth season and allowing hunters to take their 2-bird season limit on a single day.
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The N.C. Wildlife Resources Commission plans to allow hunters to take wild hogs and coyotes at night, with lights, on public lands. Commission moves toward opening more opportunities to take hogs, coyotes
The N.C. Wildlife Resources Commission took a step toward implementing a rule Thursday that allows for the taking of coyotes and feral swine by hunting on private lands at night with a light. The rule would also allow the hunting of feral swine and coyotes on public lands from ½ hour after sunset to ½ before sunrise with a light by permit only. Night hunting is one means of controlling localized populations of coyotes and feral swine, both of which are non-native to North Carolina and destructive to the landscape.
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Dates for North Carolina’s spring turkey season are set to ensure that the first peak of the breeding (and gobbling) is finished before hunters are in the woods. The Lull Ain’t Dull
Being enraptured by the pursuit of wild turkeys is akin to enslavement by alcohol, cocaine, tobacco, gambling, golf or strange women. The main advantage turkey hunting has over these other activities is it isn’t quite as hurtful to the pocketbook, although with the price of gasoline lifting off like a Saturn V rocket, it might put a ballpark-figure dent in one’s pocketbook. Other benefits are that if successful, a gobbler chaser’s reputation will soar among his buddies, plus, a wild bird provides an unmatched feast for the palate compared to bland, grocery-store-bought butterballs.
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North Carolina hunters killed more than 173,000 deer last fall, the third-highest harvest on record. Deer harvest is down 1 percent, but still third highest on record
Even with two daunting problems to overcome during the 2011-12 deer season, North Carolina hunters tagged the third-highest overall harvest on record, 173,553 whitetails, according to the N.C. Wildlife Resources Commission. The harvest was one percent below the previous season, the second-highest on record, and two percent below the all-time high from 2008-09.
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The concept of a spring season is to allow hunting only after the first round of mating has occurred. Turkey seasons set for biological reasons
Retired turkey biologist Mike Seamster said the angst today among many Tarheel State turkey hunters is caused because “they’re scouting before the season starts and hearing gobblers, so that’s when they want the season to open.”
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Patrick Murphy took this beautiful Roanoke River gobbler. Seamster is a homebody
A member of the N.C. Wildlife Resources Commission proposed a few years back that opening day of turkey season move a week ahead, to the first Saturday in April.
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Dakota Brown with his Rockingham County gobbler that is the likely No. 29 all-time typical wild turkey killed in North Carolina. High-school freshman kills huge Rockingham County bird
Apparently, Opening Day of the 2012 spring gobbler season came at just the right time for a teen-aged hunter, amid rampant reports of gobblers charging hunters and decoys. Dakota Brown, a 14-year-old freshman at Ledford High School in Davidson County, was hunting with his father, Tommy Brown, in Rockingham County when he killed a huge gobbler that carried a set of enormous spurs and will likely rank among the 30 biggest ever taken in North Carolina.
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Brian Mattison of Winston-Salem killed this fabulous wild-turkey gobbler in Lenoir County. Winston-Salem hunter kills gobbler with 8 beards in Lenoir County
Brian Mattison of Winston-Salem made a trip of nearly 200 miles for a turkey hunt last week, but the result was well worth it, even at almost four dollars a gallon for gasoline. On Saturday, April 21, hunting at Point of Neuse Plantation near Grifton in Lenoir County, Mattison lured three gobblers off the roost with two soft yelps made from his slate call behind the camouflage of his ground blind. He had no idea that one of them – the one he picked out to kill – would be one of the most-amazing toms ever taken in North Carolina, sporting eight beards.
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Emma Stone, 10, killed this 23-1/2-pound gobbler on April 23. It was her second of the season. Young girl bags two huge gobblers
The odds – this or any spring – that a North Carolina turkey hunter would shoot a 21-pound gobbler with twin beards and 1 3/8-inch spurs and name the bird “Buttercup” are about 1,000-to-1. But that's what Emma Stone did on Youth Day (April 7) in Edgecombe County.
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Conan O'Brien attempts to blow a duck call after receiving a lesson from Duck Commander's Phil Robertson. Conan O'Brien tries out duck calling after Duck Commander lesson
Late-night TV show host Conan O'Brien got duck-calling lessons from one of the best Tuesday night — Duck Commander's Phil Robertson. And he did OK. Or maybe not. Depends on who you ask.
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