Hunting News and Information

Straight Shootin
The Roanoke River Wetlands/National Wildlife Refuge probably has the biggest deer herd of any public-hunting area in North Carolina, but the Jordan game lands, in close proximity to Raleigh, Durham and Chapel Hill, gets heavier pressure and had the stateís biggest public-land harvest last season. 2012-13 Game Lands Preview
North Carolinaís 89 game lands cover 2 million acres and spread from the mountains to the sea. They offer sportsmen who donít have access to private property many opportunities to hunt every species of game in the state ó from doves to black bear. The N.C. Wildlife Resources Commissionís biologists and crews manage these public lands, which also play a key role in conservation and preservation. Commission staff members create habitat not only for wild game, but for animals that arenít hunted plus for native plants, streams and the fish that swim in them.
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Carolina Cradle Carolina Cradle
The Carolina Cradle can be affixed to the stock of your favorite turkey gun and allows you to work any 3 5/8-inch call with minimal movement. Your friction calls can be changed from slate, to glass, to any of the popular calls on the market today on a momentís notice. No more placing your calls down before picking up your gun. Hunters can now work a bird and still have their firearm in a ready mode.
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Waterfowl impoundments at Butner-Falls of Neuse Game Lands are planted in the spring and flooded in the fall to attract waterfowl of all kinds. Grant will help fund repairs to Butner-Falls of Neuse waterfowl impoundments
After 25 years, even flashboards and risers wear out, and thatís happening at waterfowl impoundments on the upper end of the Butner-Falls of the Neuse Game Land in Durham, Granville and Wake counties. Fortunately, a $125,000 supplied to Ducks Unlimited by a grant from the office of Roy Cooper, North Carolinaís attorney general, through its Environmental Enhancement Grand (EEG) Program, will help make repairs and create better wetlands habitat on the public lands.
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An application of Roundup on an area to be planted for a cool-season food plot will keep down competition with weeds. Burn, Baby, Burn!
Preparation for any seasonal planting should start several months before covering the first seed with soil. Beginning with soil tests and lime treatments, many tasks are required to prepare a site for a productive, cool-season food plot. With the planting season just around the corner, future headaches can be remedied with pre-plant burn down.
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A vulnerable month for ponds
Farm ponds are closed systems, and almost every facet can be controlled through stocking, water chemistry, fishing and nutrient supplements, creating almost any type of result you could ask for. It can be a catfish pond, big bream pond, trophy bass pond or just a balanced pond with awesome fishing. By the end of the summer, heavily fertilized ponds become vulnerable, and owners should keep a close eye on them.
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Conduct preseason photo census
Bucks should continue to hang together in their summer bachelor groups through August. Bucks of similar age will be in groups between a few to over a dozen individuals, at least until their hormones begin flowing in September. August is the perfect time to conduct a camera census on the buck population, with a series of trail cameras set up on the best food sources available.
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Cool-season food plots can contain different plants that will mature at different times to provide season-long food for wildlife. Plan cool-season planting
August is a vital month for food-plot junkies hoping for an attractive nourishment center for deer season. But cruising through fields and woods or cultivating potential plots during the sweltering August heat is not a preferred activity in the South. Ninety-degree days and 100-percent humidity keeps most folks near or inundated in air conditioning. Luckily, the cool-season planting period is still a month away, but hunters can prepare their food-plot plan for the upcoming season this month. Planting season is just around the corner!
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2011-12 Harvest by County
Harvest by County
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North Carolina Deer Seasons, 2012-13
Eastern ó Archery Sept. 8-28; Muzzleloader: Sept. 29-Oct. 12; Gun: Oct. 13-Jan. 1
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The N.C. Wildlife Resources Commission is considering going completely to an on-line system for its big-game harvest reports. It would speed up the process and save money. Deer registration may move on-line
Hunters who have been using cooperator agents, telephone calls or registering their deer harvests through the N.C. Wildlife Resources Commissionís Deer Management Assistant Program may see changes in the future.
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The herdís in good shape, and a handful of great counties are the place to be this fall. 2012 Deer Forecast
It became gin clear after the 2012 Dixie Deer Classic and the release of harvest figures from the N.C. Wildlife Resources Commission for the last hunting season that North Carolinaís deer herd is in good shape. Itís also fairly obvious that Wilkes County in the stateís northwestern corner has the stateís most-avid hunters and one of its healthiest deer populations, while three counties in the northeastern corner of the state are once again home to the most whitetails in North Carolina.
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Feds say duck numbers are well up this year
Waterfowl hunters should expect plenty of ducks over their decoys this season Ė weather permitting Ė if the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Serviceís annual report on breeding numbers holds true. The report said that total population of breeding ducks observed was 48.6 million, up 7 percent over 2011 numbers and 43 percent above the long-term (1955-2010) average. The estimate is a record high.
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