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John H. Kerr Reservoir produces lively catfishing for anglers even in winter. Cooler weather has catfish action cranking up on Kerr Lake
2255 Views - Posted: November 23, 2012 at 12:28 pm
Anglers looking to catch magnum-sized freshwater fish should think about visiting John H. Kerr Reservoir (aka Buggs Island) for blue and flathead catfish.

Guide Keith Wall of Buffalo Junction, Va., has been concentrating his efforts near Bluestone Creek and Buffalo Creeks, two of the lake’s best regions for big catfish, and he’s been catching blues and flatheads ranging from 15 to 30 pounds.

Four red wolves have been shot in eastern North Carolina since a rule took effect allowing the hunting of coyotes at night with lights. Judge halts night-hunting of coyotes with lights in 5 eastern North Carolina counties
3344 Views - Posted: November 22, 2012 at 11:08 am
A Wake County superior court judge has granted a temporary injunction prohibiting the taking of coyotes at night with the aid of lights in five counties in eastern North Carolina, one week after a red wolf was found killed – the fourth such killing since the N.C. Wildlife Resources Commission passed a temporary rule allowing night-hunting for coyotes in July.

The injunction is in effect in Dare, Tyrrell, Hyde, Washington and Beaufort counties, the only location in the world where red wolves are free roaming. The population has been estimated at around 100 animals.

The latest red wolf killed was found Nov. 14 in Hyde County. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service is offering a $2,500 reward for information pertaining to the killing of red wolves, a protected species that were reintroduced to the Alligator River National Wildlife Refuge in 1987.

Nathan Isner's 23-point Guilford County buck could approach the 180-inch mark as a non-typical. He killed it in a grown-up field out of the loft in a barn. Guilford County hunter scores on huge non-typical
6807 Views - Posted: November 21, 2012 at 6:52 pm
Nathan Isner of Julian started getting regular trail-cam photos of a huge, non-typical buck on some land in southern Guilford County late in the summer. He admitted later, he was a bit shocked.

“When I got the first picture of him, I about fell out of my chair,” Isner said.

Fortunately, his “plan of attack” worked, and on Nov. 14, Isner finally got a look at the buck, made a good shot and was stunned when he got to the buck and started counting.

The big, main-frame 8-pointer had a total of 23 scoreable points and will likely approach the 180-inch mark, making it the latest huge buck from Guilford County, one of the state’s most heavily populated counties.

Speckled trout fishing has been great in the Cape Fear River and around the Masonboro Inlet jetties. Trout fishing on Cape Fear coast has been speck-tacular
3525 Views - Posted: November 20, 2012 at 9:57 am
This has been a fall to catch speckled trout, and the action along the Cape Fear coast is as good as anywhere. Catching fish is expected and filling limits with many releases is the norm. It doesn’t get much better than this.

Capt Stu Caulder of Gold Leader Guide Service in Wrightsville Beach said the trout fishing has been as good as he has ever seen it. He said the trout aren’t huge, but there are enough large ones in the mix to keep fishermen excited. Caulder said the majority are ranging from 15 to 20 inches, but they are on a feed and biting readily.

Scoring a typical whitetail deer rack isn't a difficult task, if you follow a few instructions. Score your own deer. It's a snap.  Video Included
3062 Views - Posted: November 19, 2012 at 2:08 pm
The Boone and Crockett scoring system for whitetail deer is the most commonly used and recognized scoring system. The system is also used by the Pope and Young Club (archery), as well as most state organizations in determining records.

A typical whitetail deer is not difficult to score yourself with a little guidance. In this video, Bill Howard, an official Pope and Young measurer, shares how to green score your own trophies.

Youths will have a week's head start on adult turkey hunters beginning in 2013. Commission tables pen-raised deer proposals, approves Youth-Only Wild-Turkeys season
1652 Views - Posted: November 18, 2012 at 8:31 pm
The N.C. Wildlife Resources Commission backed off several of its proposed changes to hunting, fishing and trapping regulations, voting to table one controversial proposal and altering several before approving them at the Nov. 8 meeting.

The Commission tabled a far-reaching proposal that would have made it much easier to move pen-raised deer within the state and into the state from others, opting instead to form a task force with the N.C. Department of Agriculture and several stakeholder groups to look at the state’s regulation of pen-raised deer in view of the ever-broadening scope of Chronic Wasting Disease.

The Commission also cut out one section of a proposal that would ease restrictions on landowners’ ability to remove wildlife in the act of depredation. The Commission voted down a proposal that would have allowed hunters to use lights to take deer in the act of depredation without a permit, while letting stand a proposal that would remove the limit on deer that could be removed, as long as they were taken in the act of depredation. It also allows landowners who remove game animals in the act of depredation to keep the meat for personal use.

Cindy Caudle of Hickory caught the 3-pound speckled trout fishign with Capt. Matt Lamb of Chasin' Tails Outdoors.
Speckled trout fishing at its peak in Atlantic Beach area
2424 Views - Posted: November 16, 2012 at 12:47 pm
Even if you have not developed the feel for catching speckled trout, they are biting so well in the Atlantic Beach area you can still catch limits and release a bunch. It really is time to quit wishing and go fishing.

Capt. Matt Lamb of Chasin’ Tails Outdoors said fishermen are catching trout everywhere in the waters around Atlantic Beach and Morehead City, especially in the surf. Lamb said the past few weeks have seen exceptionally fishing.

“I’ve been talking to some of the old-timers, and they are saying this is the best trout fishing in the surf they can remember,” Lamb said. “The fish aren’t all large, but there are some nice ones. Most are about 17 to 19 inches, and they are biting hard.”

Jordan Lake has recovered from its October funk and now is producing largemouth bass for anglers such as Jeff Thomas. Bass at Jordan, Harris back to biting ways
1956 Views - Posted: November 16, 2012 at 12:35 pm
Bass fishing has snapped out of the October doldrums at Shearon Harris and Jordan lakes.

“The Harris Lake topwater bite has been really good,” said guide Jeff Thomas of Broadway. “The water has dropped, and the grass lines are really prevalent.”

Kaylin Duncan (left) killed this 155-inch 10-point buck in Caswell County on Oct. 29. Caswell County produces another great buck
5977 Views - Posted: November 15, 2012 at 9:51 am
The deer mating season in Caswell County was good to Kaylin Duncan of Leasburg.

Within eight days during the rut’s peak, Duncan downed a pair of large-racked bucks, one a 150-inch 10-pointer and the other a 9-pointer. He killed both hunting with a muzzleloader from the same ground blind.

Duncan dropped the big 10-pointer on Oct. 29. Gross-scored at 155 Boone-and-Crockett inches, the buck had only four inches of deductions and will net 151. Duncan, 48, killed the 205-pound 9-pointer on Nov. 6; he hasn’t had it scored yet.

Fall wahoo fishing has been great in offshore waters off Cape Lookout, but fishermen are filling their fish boxes with blackfin tuna and dolphin, and running into an occasional sailfish, too. With storms in rearview mirrow, great offshore trolling returns to Cape Lookout area
1798 Views - Posted: November 12, 2012 at 8:15 am
Bluewater fish were really biting before Hurricane Sandy and a nor’easter pushed up the east coast, and fishermen are expecting the action to be just a good when they get back out to the Big Rock as the winds finally lay out.

“The bite was really good before the two blows, and we expect it to be hot still when we get back out,” said Capt. Tony Ross of Wet-N-Wild Sportfishing in Atlantic Beach. “We were catching wahoo and blackfin tuna – which we expect in late October and early November – plus some late sailfish and dolphin, which aren’t expected this time of year.”

Ross said that his latest party boated 21 dolphin and caught and released a sailfish in addition to the half-dozen wahoo and blackfin tuna they expected to catch. He said this has been an exceptional year for sailfish, but no one expected them to be around this late in the fall. Of course, no one is complaining.

Steve Patterson's 8-point Orange County buck carried a rack with better than 140 inches of horn. Orange County spits out another trophy 8-point buck
6760 Views - Posted: November 11, 2012 at 12:15 pm
Steve Patterson had such a great hunt in Ohio at the beginning of last week that he had an even better hunt back in North Carolina later in the week.

Patterson, a 26-year-old Duke Energy employee from Concord, travelled to Ohio last Sunday for a week-long bowhunt on public land. He killed a 118-inch 8-pointer the first afternoon he hunted, allowing him to return home to North Carolina and kill a 140-inch 8-pointer on Wednesday in Orange County with the same bow.

“I’m still in shock,” he said. “I’ll have a hard time topping this. The one I killed in Ohio was my biggest buck before the one I killed back here.”

Striped bass are active now in the waters of the western Pamlico River, especially near Washington. Striper action great in western Pamlico River
3048 Views - Posted: November 10, 2012 at 7:06 pm
Striped bass are active and feeding in the western Pamlico River.

Danny Joe Humphrey of Carolina Fish and Fur in Kinston said fishermen should search for aquatic grasses that attract baitfish and check out the bridge abutments crossing the river and other local streams.

“The reason stripers are called ‘rockfish’ is because they love to hang around rocks, and that’s what you’ve got at the bridge crossings and rivers,” he said, explaining that stripers also like “grass” because it holds oxygenated water, which contains the baitfish they eat.