Marine Electronics



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To discover how much deeper your engine’s skeg runs than your transducer, park your boat on a level surface and measure the distances. How to keep your electronics from hurting you
75 Views - Posted: October 16 at 9:00 am

“Garbage in, garbage out” was a watchword with computers long before they were integrated into marine electronics. We rarely enter full-blown garbage into our stuff out on the water but expensive problems can stem from not giving some “minor” details the attention they deserve.


U.S. Army Sgt. Cody Harris of the 82nd Airborne arrowed this great buck at Fort Bragg. Fort Bragg spits out great archery buck for 82nd Airborne soldier
3736 Views - Posted: October 16 at 7:36 am

It’s not often a hunter’s first deer is a trophy animal. It’s even rarer to take a Pope and Young Club buck as a first bow kill. But Sgt. Cody Harris did his homework – and the needed work – and reaped a nice reward Sept. 14 at Fort Bragg.


Lake Norman anglers can't do without a Sabiki rig when it comes to catching every species of gamefish imaginable. Sabiki rigs working over various Lake Norman species
751 Views - Posted: October 15 at 11:41 am

Lake Norman, like many other reservoirs in North Carolina, has seen major changes in its fish species. Once filled with largemouth bass, catfish, crappie and bream, striped bass were added in the 1960s, followed by blueback herring, alewives and spotted bass – it’s assumed that fishermen brought in these non-natives –and finally, white perch. Fortunately, there’s one rig that will catch nearly every fish that Norman has to offer: the Sabiki rig.


The hunting clothes that Debbie Hall wore when she killed this Stokes County 8-point buck wouldn’t have been available for women 15 years ago. Dressed to the nines, finally
164 Views - Posted: October 15 at 7:00 am

Katrina Arpin remembers what it was like to get dressed to go hunting 15 years ago, when she got her start in the wilds of Minnesota.


Rhonda Snyder took this Orange County trophy last fall with a crossbow. Crossbows have led women into hunting
163 Views - Posted: October 15 at 7:00 am

One factor that many people believe has had a big impact on women joining the ranks of hunters is new, more-liberal regulations regarding crossbows.


Two programs are available that pair bowhunters who need a place to hunt with landowners who want their deer population reduced. Programs will put hunters, landowners together
98 Views - Posted: October 15 at 7:00 am

Hunters looking for the opportunity to hunt land that’s close to suburban or urban areas have two programs existing that could put them in touch with landowners who would like their shrubbery and/or gardens protected from the onslaught of whitetail deer.


Fifty municipalities in North Carolina will participate in the Urban Archery Season, which runs from mid-January to mid-February, 2015. North Carolina’s urban archery initiative
69 Views - Posted: October 15 at 7:00 am

The deer population around the suburban areas continues to boom, and the list of complaints from homeowners losing their valuable landscaping is becoming endless — not to mention the number of deer-vehicle collisions is on the rise, with millions of dollars of damages nationwide.


A posted sign in the suburbs might point to a great hunting opportunity if handled correctly. Seek out areas protected by “No Hunting” signs!
76 Views - Posted: October 15 at 7:00 am

As development progresses, more and more woodlots that once housed plenty of wildlife will be added to the asphalt jungle. Visions of progress seen through the developer’s eyes brings big bucks to property owners along the outskirts of town, yet some landowners refuse to sell land that has been in their family for generations and these areas remain wooded, undisturbed, and often have “No Hunting” signs on every perimeter tree. If played right with the landowners, hunters can get into these areas for some fantastic hunting opportunities.


Speckled trout can be caught around the same oyster rocks as redfish; they can also be targeted outside of creek mouths and on points in New River Inlet. Keep an eye out for trout
113 Views - Posted: October 15 at 7:00 am

Even when he’s targeting a really good bite on big red drum, guide Ricky Kellum always has his finger on the pulsed of the New River’s speckled trout, and October brings with it opportunities to catch them in New River Inlet.


The break between the Continental shelf and Continental slope lies roughly between 70 and 80 fathoms off the North Carolina coast. Fishing the break
141 Views - Posted: October 15 at 7:00 am

What exactly do fishermen mean when they say they are “fishing the break?”


Solar Bees may help sting Jordan fish kills Solar Bees may help sting Jordan fish kills
138 Views - Posted: October 15 at 7:00 am

A program by the N.C. Division of Water Quality to help prevent algae blooms in Jordan Lake may also help prevent fish kills.


New technology available for marine electronics can make trolling for crappie a snap. Eye in the sky makes trolling easier
84 Views - Posted: October 15 at 7:00 am

One troublesome aspect of fall “tight-line” deep trolling for crappies at Jordan Lake is trying to keep a boat “in the slot.”


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