• Hog Hunting

    Nathan Coffey of Lynchburg, Va. killed this big boar at Cottonwood Plantation in Edgecombe County, N.C.

    410-pound boar killed in Edgecombe County, N.C.

    Nathan Coffey of Lynchburg, Va. has been hunting at Cottonwood Plantation of North Carolina in Edgecombe County for several years, and on Oct. 4th, he killed a trophy boar that weighed over 410 pounds. 

    October 12 at 11:08pm
    Cody Durham and Mitch Mincey killed these two 300+ pound hogs in Jackson County on a night hunt.

    Western N.C. boar hunt produces two 300-plus pounders

    Cody Durham and Mitch Mincey recently went on a hog hunt in Jackson County, and had a very interesting trip. While most people think of the eastern part of the state when talking about hog hunting, their western North Carolina trip produced some good hogs, but there was more to this hunt than just waiting for hogs to show up. It could have passed as a scouting trip for bears.

    May 16 at 2:25pm
    Wild hogs cause plenty of problems for property managers throughout the state.

    Feral swine interfere with prescribed burning

    Feral swine are causing yet another problem for South Carolina's natural resources, this time by interfering with prescribed burning.

    April 13 at 10:01pm
    Proper handling and processing of wild hogs is key to preventing the spread of hog diseases.

    Potential pig problems

    One recurring theme being discussed by hunters across South Carolina is the increasing number of wild hogs. 

    February 15 at 7:00am
    The author killed this wild hog after dark thanks to less-restrictive regulations put in place by the S.C. Department of Natural Resources.

    Regs have made hog-hunting easier

    Biologist Charles Ruth of the S.C. Department of Natural Resources said the laws for harvesting wild hogs have been made much less restrictive in recent years to help reduce the growing population.

    February 15 at 7:00am
    Baiting with foods like corn will often concentrate hogs in areas they’re already using, giving hunters an added advantage.

    Hog harvest crosses county lines

    As part of the annual deer hunter survey, the S.C. Department of Natural Resources asks deer hunters to provide information on their wild-hog harvesting activities because so many animals are taken incidental to deer hunting.

    February 15 at 7:00am
    Because hogs are rarely loners, the opportunity for taking more than one animal on a hunt is very good.

    Go hog wild

    Hog hunting is a very popular sport in South Carolina and one that hunters can enjoy throughout the year, around the clock within certain parameters. 

    But there are hunters who hunt hogs — and then there are hog hunters.

    February 01 at 7:00am
    Enormous piles of vegetables, including onions, cabbage, sweet potatoes  and corn, will draw in hungry wild hogs.

    A great pile of vegetables will bring wild hogs into gun range

    To attract massive numbers of hogs and hold them in the vicinity, hunters should use lots of bait. 

    January 15 at 7:00am
    A good pair of binoculars can help hunters determine which wild hogs have the biggest tusks if a trophy animal is the objective.

    Picking out a trophy wild hog can be tough for many hunters

    Shooting the first feral hog that steps clear from a group or “sounder” and offers a good shot would be fine for a hunter interested mostly in the meat, but for a hunter looking for a trophy boar and a full head mount or skull mount, it requires steady nerves to find the one with the longest tusks. 

    January 15 at 7:00am
    Johnnie Dale and Tommy Sullivan drag a 200-pound boar hog out of the woods.

    Hogs and bogs -Pull North Carolina hogs out of their swampy homes and you can put bacon on the table

    Many hunters feel as though they’ve lost their best friends during the downtime between the end of deer and bear season and the beginning of spring turkey season. However, those who want to continue to experience the thrill that only seeing a large animal brings are increasingly turning to feral hogs.

    January 01 at 7:00am
    Hogs are a nuisance, but offer good sport and tasty table fare to hunters like these from Big Country Outdoors.

    Hog hunting with dogs is sure-fire way to put bacon on the plate

    Hogs are a known nuisance to farmers, landowners, and hunters. They do damage to crops, food plots, and take away food sources and habitat from other game animals. Fortunately, they offer good sport to hunters, and are tasty on the plate. Though they aren’t the most desirable animals for a number of reasons, they do add another game animal for hunters to pursue.

    November 12, 2015 at 10:15pm
    Deer hunters are generally encouraged to shoot wild hogs, but handling the carcasses and resulting meat requires some precautions to prevent contraction of several diseases.

    Top 6 steps to avoid these wild hog diseases

    Feral hogs can carry a number of diseases, some of which can be contracted by humans. And at least one of those nasty bacterial infections can be fatal.

    But cleaning and consuming feral hogs can be done safely, as long as you take some commonsense steeps to prevent contamination.

    Here are the top 6 ways to safely handle feral hogs:

    September 23, 2015 at 3:36pm
    Handling pig carcasses after the hunt requires some precautions to prevent contamination with any of the several diseases wild hogs carry.

    6 wild hog diseases to avoid

    Feral hogs are everywhere these days, so deer hunters are bound to run across them during time afield. And putting some of the pigs down is a great way to manage their burgeoning populations, which can cause habitat problems.

    In fact, most biologists encourage hunters to shoot every hog possible.

    But there are some potential health concerns when handling hogs, according to biologists.

    September 23, 2015 at 3:33pm
    Shooting hogs can help control their populations, but it's important to take precautions when cleaning them so you don't contract any of the several contagious diseases the animals carry.

    Top 6 tips to safely clean wild hogs

    Feral hogs can carry a number of diseases, some of which can be contracted by humans. And at least one of those nasty bacterial infections can be fatal.

    But cleaning and consuming feral hogs can be done safely, as long as you take some commonsense steeps to prevent contamination.

    Here are the top 6 ways to safely handle feral hogs:

    September 23, 2015 at 2:44pm
    Wild hogs provide extra targets during deer season, but the animals carry several contagious diseases that demand hunters take precautions.

    6 feral hog-borne diseases to avoid

    Feral hogs are everywhere these days, so deer hunters are bound to run across them during time afield. And putting some of the pigs down is a great way to manage their burgeoning populations, which can cause habitat problems.

    In fact, most biologists encourage hunters to shoot every hog possible.

    But there are some potential health concerns when handling hogs, according to biologists.

    September 23, 2015 at 2:40pm
    Earl Trent of Harmony killed his huge grey hog on a South Carolina hunt last weekend.

    One shot with a .243 between the eyes, and the Grey Ghost is no more

    Earl Trent of Harmony had hunted unsuccessfully for hogs for years – until July 20, when he harvested a beast of a wild boar. Known locally as the “Grey Ghost” the hog, which weighed close to 500 pounds, made the fatal mistake of looking directly at Trent, who placed a 100-grain .243 slug directly between its eyes, ending the legend that roamed a Dillon County, S.C., tract that is part of Cherokee Run Hunting Lodge.

    July 29, 2015 at 5:20pm