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The federal protection of red wolves in five eastern North Carolina counties apparently trumps the state's right to manage coyotes, according to a federal judge's decision. Judge puts halt to coyote hunting in five NE NC counties
1421 Views - Posted: May 30 at 12:01 pm

A U.S. District Court judge issued a temporary injunction earlier this month that banned coyote hunting in five counties in eastern North Carolina because endangered red wolves may have been mistakenly killed in the same areas, but the decision will be up for review in September.


Roy Sowers (left) killed this Chatham County coyote; every one of North Carolina’s 100 counties has a coyote population. Coyote information station
366 Views - Posted: January 15 at 7:00 am

• Coyotes appeared in North Carolina in the early 1980s after illegal relocations from out of state and releases for sport hunting with hounds. Natural range expansion from Tennessee, Georgia and South Carolina helped them get a foothold in all 100 counties by 2000.


Coyotes are adaptable enough and are in enough places that wiping them out by trapping or hunting won’t happen. USDA trapper: coyotes cannot be eradicated
403 Views - Posted: January 15 at 7:00 am

The assistant director of the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Wildlife Service said no state can eradicate coyotes.


Prescribed burns and other normal forestry measures are seldom undertaken on national forests, to the detriment of many wildlife species. Forestry considerations
227 Views - Posted: January 15 at 7:00 am

Due in part to pressure from environmental concerns, the U.S. Forest Service heavily curtailed timber harvest in national forests in the late 1980s. This has impacts a number of species, including a reduction in many game populations that are dependent on early successional growth for both protection and food supply.


A 16- or 20-gauge double-barrel shotgun choked improved cylinder and modified is a perfect gun to carry all day in mountainous grouse country. Grouse hunting things to know
423 Views - Posted: January 15 at 7:00 am

• Guns and shells - You will be walking long distances and hunting in tight quarters; depending on your personal preference, any good birding gun will do, but bigger is not necessarily better. A lightweight 16- or 20-gauge over/under or side-by-side double-barrel with 26- to 28-inch barrels is recommended. All you need is one shot, so a semi-automatic isn’t necessary. Chokes range from skeet to modified, and you’ll want a tighter choke on your second barrel for the longer second shot, if presented. Preferred shot size is No. 71/2, but a No. 6 will often be in the second barrel.


Grouse will often fly uphill when pointed by dogs or flushed wild. Grouse hunting particulars
316 Views - Posted: January 15 at 7:00 am

Follow these tips to improve your chances of having a productive grouse hunt:


Hunters Jefferson Boaz, Folger Boaz, Chase Harris, Jeremy Johnson and Frank Harris took these tundra swans hunting with guides Charles Haywood and Karl Helmkamp of Albemarle Outfitters. Swan Hunting Permits
573 Views - Posted: January 15 at 7:00 am

Tundra swans do a tremendous amount of damage to winter field crops, in northeast North Carolina, so the N.C. Wildlife Resources Commission issues 5,000 permits to hunt tundra swans each year.


Staying hidden is much more important on late-season hunts, so building a blind from natural sources is often a good idea. Late-season dove tips
513 Views - Posted: January 15 at 7:00 am

Andy Pope and Lowrie Beacham have developed habits in their pursuit of late-season doves that are worth sharing:


Coyotes are unwelcome visitors in North Carolina. Unwelcome night visitors - Top-drawer predators are making pests of themselves, but they provide a great off-season target for North Carolina deer hunters
1130 Views - Posted: January 01 at 7:00 am

Like embarrassing relatives or low-information voters, several things are true about coyotes in North Carolina:


Guide Joshua Swaim shows the kind of gamebird for which North Carolina’s mountains are famous. Ruff-ing it - The Pisgah National Forest is a grouse hot spot for North Carolina hunters who know where to look and what to look for
683 Views - Posted: January 01 at 7:00 am

If you’ve been considering joining a gym, buying some exercise equipment or taking up a weight-loss program to try and drop those 10 pounds — or maybe it’s 15 — you may have added over the holidays, here’s an alternative. 


A handful of huge tundra swans dropping into a spread of decoys is a sight that many waterfowlers will never forget. Swan song - How to call up a tundra swan
707 Views - Posted: December 01, 2013 at 6:00 am

The urge to look up was overwhelming, especially for the youngsters crouched in the small drainage ditch separating two wheat fields near Pungo Lake and the Pocosin Lakes Wildlife Refuge in Washington County. The whistling honk of tundra swans filled the air as flocks of the large, white birds circled the area deciding which field looked better for breakfast.  


Don’t miss going afield during the last segment of North Carolina’s dove season. Dove Dusting - Cold-weather dove hunting can be some of the best North Carolina hunters can experience
646 Views - Posted: December 01, 2013 at 6:00 am

Long underwear: check.


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