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Toby Grantham of Knightdale caught this potential state-record African pompano this past weekend on the Continental Shelf out of Morehead City. Knightdale angler has another state record in his pocket
1881 Views - Posted: May 14 at 12:01 pm

Few anglers ever catch a state-record fish, but Toby Grantham of Knightdale has now done it twice. He caught the record scamp grouper two years ago on a trip aboard Capt. Dave Tilley’s Continental Shelf out of Morehead City, and last weekend, he caught a potential record African pompano on another trip with Tilley.


Shallow, stained water is the ticket for catching Lake Wylie bass on spinnerbaits. Go over to the dark side
335 Views - Posted: March 15 at 8:00 am

For many anglers, night time is the right time for catching bass, and March is a great time to doing it in the dark on Wylie.

“Some fish are already shallow, and a lot of fish that are suspending on secondary points will come in and cruise the shallows at dusk, and they all seem to let their guard down a little bit once the sun goes down,” said Mike Stone, who fishes Lake Wylie more than a hundred days a year.

The lake is also less crowded at night, as most anglers prefer to leave while it’s still light out. Stone said they are missing out on some of the best fishing Wylie has to offer, and some of the best bass fishing —day or night — in the Carolinas.


High water that’s stained to dirty is a big draw for Lake Wylie bass looking to head for the shallows. High water is an angler’s friend
247 Views - Posted: March 15 at 8:00 am

March is typically a rainy month, and as part of the Catawba River system, Lake Wylie gets local rain as well as rain and melting snow from the waterways well upstream, which means anglers will get to fish their share of high water this month.

For fishermen like Mike Stephens of Charlotte, that’s a blessing.

“When I fish Lake Wylie in March, I want it to be high water,” said Stephens, who won a Carolinas Bass Classic event on Wylie last March during a period of high water. “These bass have spawning on their minds, and a lot of them are shallow, just waiting for the right water temperature to spawn. Some are at different depths and random locations in or just outside of the creeks. 


Riprapped banks cover plenty of Lake Wylie’s shoreline, and fishermen need to target them in March. Riprap is big key at Wylie
244 Views - Posted: March 15 at 8:00 am

The large rocks that line much of Lake Wylie’s shoreline are called riprap, and plenty of it is submerged below the surface. Marc Deschenes said this creates a food chain that anglers can take advantage of.

“Crayfish love to hide in the crevices, and algae grows along the rocks, attracting baitfish, which attract bigger fish,” said Deschenes, who targets bass around these rocks with a jig and crawdad chunk trailer. The trailer adds size to the jig, aids the lure’s buoyancy and helps it flutter slowly to the bottom like a real crawdad or injured fish would.


Bass fishing gets cranked up on Lake Wylie early, but fish are usually on the move. Wylie’s wandering whoppers - Learn how to fish both Marches for Lake Wylie bass
740 Views - Posted: March 01 at 7:00 am

Gastonia’s Mike Stone was casting a jerkbait across a point near Lake Wylie’s Buster Boyd Bridge; he gave the bait another twitch, let it settle, then a smile spread across his face as he set the hook and began to reel in a 3 1/2-pound bass.

“This month is, by far, my favorite month to catch bass on Lake Wylie. March is when the most fish, as well as the biggest fish, bite throughout the month,” Stone said. “But it’s a bit of a strange month and probably the biggest transition month of the year on this lake.


Jason Cox of Ft. Bragg caught wrestled this hefty red grouper out of its underwater lair. Get ready for the long haul
680 Views - Posted: October 15, 2013 at 7:00 am

Fishing on extended trips, whether from a head boat like the Continental Shelf or from a smaller private vessel, is fun and cooler-filling, but doesn’t come without its challenges.


Tackle for pulling big grouper out of deep-water cover needs to be plenty stout. The right tools for the job
495 Views - Posted: October 15, 2013 at 7:00 am

As with any job, anglers need the right tools for bottom-fishing, especially when fish like amberjack and grouper are likely to bite. And on extended trips, where depths can reach the 600-foot range, you don’t want to be caught with undersized gear.


Mapping out success Mapping out success
539 Views - Posted: October 15, 2013 at 7:00 am

Capt. Davie Tilley of the Continental Shelf understands that many anglers opt to fish out of their own private vessels, but he is still willing to help them out through a service he offers called “Fish Here Maps.”


Toby Grantham caught this state-record scamp grouper on a 48-hour bottom-fishing trip last October aboard the Continental Shelf. Get to the bottom of it - Extended bottom-fishing trips out of Morehead City mean more fish for more fishermen
1163 Views - Posted: October 01, 2013 at 7:00 am

“Okay gentlemen, drop it down, drop it down, drop it down. All the way to the bottom. If you’re not on the bottom, you can’t catch these fish.” 


Abigail Johnson of Charlotte, 11, caught this bream fishing at the McDowell Nature Preserve on the shores of Lake Wylie. Mecklenburg County parks full of fishing opportunities
2363 Views - Posted: August 16, 2013 at 3:00 pm

Numerous fishing spots dot the landscape of Charlotte and Mecklenburg County, offering urban anglers a chance to wet a line without having to set aside a whole day for it. 


Toby Grantham’s 27.6-pound scamp grouper was certified as North Carolina’s first state record for that species. Knightdale man’s catch certified as North Carolina’s first state-record scamp grouper.
2541 Views - Posted: January 16, 2013 at 9:00 am
When Toby Grantham of Knightdale held up a scamp grouper he’d just caught last Sept. 25, Dave Tilley, the captain of the Continental Shelf, exclaimed, “That’s a potential state record!”

Tilley was correct.

On Jan. 14, the N.C. Division of Marine Fisheries certified the 27.6-pound fish as its first state-record scamp grouper.