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Gorgesí rivers are tops

The Jocassee Gorges, covering 43,000 acres in the mountains of North Carolina and South Carolina, is a place of such wild and scenic beauty that National Geographic designated it as one of its “50 destinations of a lifetime.”

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April 19 at 9:00 am
2437 Views

March still offers options

Prime spring fishing is just around the corner, as mountain streams begin warming up, and brown trout, rainbow trout and brook trout become active and hungry, eager to gobble up the abundant spring hatches. It’s a time when anglers enjoy some of the best trout fishing of the year.

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March 19 at 9:00 am
1864 Views

Donít forget trout lakes

Western North Carolina and South Carolina’s Upstate have dozens of lakes with fair to excellent populations of trout. Some of these lakes, especially smaller ones, are classified as hatchery-supported waters and are regularly stocked with catchable-size fish in the spring and † † winter. In larger reservoirs, both stocked and wild trout enter the lakes via tributaries.

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February 19 at 9:00 am
5629 Views

Dry weather is a variable

Western North Carolina and South Carolina’s Upstate had the driest summer and fall on record, seasons marked by scores of wildfires, closures of state parks, burning bans and water restrictions.

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January 19 at 9:00 am
1564 Views

Go to nymphs in winter

Although spring is undoubtedly the ideal season to fish for mountain trout, winter fishing also has its merits. What most discover is that they catch fewer, but larger, fish. The downside of winter fishing, particularly during the bitter cold of January and February, is that the fishing can test an angler’s mettle and patience.

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December 19, 2016 at 9:00 am
1877 Views

Cool weather is welcome

After a record dry and hot summer, fall has arrived in the mountains, bringing cooler weather and, hopefully, improved trout-fishing conditions.

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November 19, 2016 at 9:00 am
1432 Views

How to tie your own trout flies

Seeing a trout rise to a fly is always a thrill, no matter how often you fish. Having a trout rise to a fly you’ve tied yourself is a greater thrill.

Tying flies is an art, a craft and a science, the concocting of feathers, fur, thread, yarn and other material to produce a fly that looks enough like an insect to make a trout think it’s the real thing.

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October 19, 2016 at 9:00 am
1497 Views

The Chattooga beckons

One of the five largest and longest free-flowing rivers in the Southeast, the Chattooga begins its 52-mile journey below Whiteside Mountain in Jackson County near Cashiers, N.C., flowing south and entering the Nantahala National forest below Cashiers Lake. After leaving North Carolina, the river forms the border between South Carolina and Georgia, flanked by the Sumter National Forest in South Carolina and the Chattahoochee National Forest in Georgia, offering a variety of trout fishing experiences before entering Lake Tugalo in northeastern Georgia.

Designated as a National Wild and Scenic River in 1974 and rated as one of the top 100 trout streams in the nation by Trout Unlimited, the Chattooga is regulated as wild trout waters, delayed-harvest waters and general waters, according to the section being fished.

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September 19, 2016 at 9:00 am
3770 Views
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